I am an assistant professor of political science at the University of California, Merced. My research spans comparative politics, political economy, and political behavior, but focuses on media and information, public opinion, and reform and transition in authoritarian countries, particularly China. Methodologically I use formal modeling, survey research, and/or experimental methods. My sole-authored articles are published or forthcoming in the American Political Science Review, British Journal of Political Science, Comparative Politics, Journal of Contemporary China, Journal of East Asian Studies, Journal of Theoretical Politics, and Political Research Quarterly. I also have co-authored articles forthcoming in Political Science Research and Methods and the British Journal of Political Science. I have a Ph.D. in political science and an M.A. in economics, both from Duke University, as well as an M.P.P. from UC Berkeley. I once worked in what is now the Ministry of Commerce of China, which I would like to think gave me some direct understanding of bureaucracy and governance. Between doctoral work and formally joining UC Merced I was a formal theory and quantitative methods postdoc at Princeton University.